Hydraulic elevators
Conventional hydraulic elevators. They use an underground cylinder, are quite common for low level buildings with 2–5 floors (sometimes but seldom up to 6–8 floors), and have speeds of up to 1 m/s (200 ft/min).
Hole less hydraulic elevators were developed in the 1970s, and use a pair of above ground cylinders, which makes it practical for environmentally or cost sensitive buildings with 2, 3, or 4 floors.
Roped hydraulic elevators use both above ground cylinders and a rope system, allowing the elevator to travel further than the piston has to move.

The low mechanical complexity of hydraulic elevators in comparison to traction elevators makes them ideal for low rise, low traffic installations. They are less energy efficient as the pump works against gravity to push the car and its passengers upwards; this energy is lost when the car descends on its own weight. The high current draw of the pump when starting up also places higher demands on a building’s electrical system. There are also environmental concerns should the lifting cylinder leak fluid into the ground
 

HYDRAULIC LIFT